Travels

The legacy of El Quijote by the towns of La Mancha

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I am convinced that when Cervantes wrote the first lines of Don Quixote, the writer was aware that he had something very big in his hands. He knew exactly what he was doing leaving that famous town of La Mancha in anonymity and that in the not too distant future many scholars and mayors would fight to be the famous people.

Philological discussions aside, there is no doubt that the region of La Mancha is the main protagonist of the play and all its peoples can feel proud and recipients of universal work.

On the occasion of the IV centenary of the death of Cervantes, the existing Don Quixote Route He has received a face lift and offers a sensational excuse to discover the charms of La Mancha.

The mills of Consuegra

In this quixotic route, some place names appear clearly in the novel, such as El Toboso, Argamasilla de Alba or Tembleque. Others can be intuited. And, in short, through his adventures he has traced a route of 30 villages or enclaves that are a pretext for all audiences - both for faithful devotees of the universal work and for those fleeing from books containing more than 1000 pages - to discover the beauty of the villages of La Mancha.

We will keep track of any of them.

Argamasilla de Alba and the Cave of Medrano

Theatrical scenery in Argamasilla de Alba

Argamasilla de Alba oozes Cervantes and Quijote in each street. This town has been linked to the author's history since its inception and has even been the only place that has managed to raise the Royal Spanish Language Academy from its Madrid poltronas to hold its annual meeting.

Do you want to see the walls that kept Miguel de Cervantes imprisoned for a while? In the Medrano House there is a cave where tradition marks, from the author's first biographers, that the writer was captive in this place and began to elucidate the first sketches of the character of Don Quixote.

Whether for a love affair or for some discussion when executing his work as a tax collector, it seems that Miguel de Cervantes suffered imprisonment in the House of Medrano and also met one Rodrigo de Pacheco, a half-crazy gentleman who It will possibly inspire you for your later great work.

The Medrano cave where apparently Cervantes was imprisoned

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