Travels

Ölüdeniz: the Turkish pearl of the Mediterranean conquered by the English

Pin
Send
Share
Send


Views of Ölüdeniz from the hillside

Ölüdeniz It is one of those places that I would like to have reached a hundred years ago. Or two hundred.

The natural beauty of this place is something that I find very complicated to describe in words. Not even my low quality camera can capture it properly. It is one of those places that you have to do with your own eyes to realize the magnitude of its beauty. Not surprisingly, its beaches - that of the town and that of the well-known Blue lagoon- They have been chosen, on numerous occasions, among the 5 best in the World. It is true that these classifications are very subjective and obey a multitude of commercial interests, but I attest that I I haven't found waters like that almost anywhere.

I saw Ölüdeniz for the first time emerging from among the branches of the pines. I was walking along the Lycian Route -a spectacular trekking that covers the distance between Antalya and Fethiye- and, turning a bend in the road I saw the Blue lagoon (Blue Lagoon). Its waters reflect different shades between blue and green. It is framed in mountains completely covered by Mediterranean pines whose skirts die in the lagoon. Only one shore has a patch of sand that is not commercially exploited and that is where I took my first bath after a night in which I suffered the worst storm of my life.

My first vision of the town, coming down the path of Fethiye

I enjoyed immersed in the cold water while looking around. Only green and mountains. Birds and more water of various colors. The lagoon was mired in a peace that would soon break the dozens of tourists who already had breakfast in their resorts. Some on the banks of that same lagoon. And that is, in my opinion, the cancer that makes Ölüdeniz not, today, the paradise that must have been when the Lycians walked through these forests and they sailed, with their ships full of merchandise, through these seas.

In the 70s the British tourist industry discovered this sleepy coastal town. Four decades later one should look at his map about ten times to make sure he is in Turkey. Ölüdeniz is only part of Atatürk's homeland on paper. In practice she is one more daughter of the perfidious Albion. And I did not like that.

After the bath I loaded my backpack on my back and walked the kilometer that separates the beach to which I descended from the mountain of the town itself. When I reached the promenade of Ölüdeniz I was speechless.

Ölüdeniz shopping street

Pin
Send
Share
Send