Travels

Naxos Island in Greece

Pin
Send
Share
Send


The last stop of our trip to Greece that we made last May took us to the Naxos Island.

Naxos is the largest and most fertile island in the Aegean Cyclades. It receives a fairly decent amount of rainfall per year for the area and this causes vegetables and fruits to grow which, together with livestock and the prolific tourism sector, make it totally self-sufficient.

To get there it can be done by internal flight from Athens, but we came from another island of the Cyclades, Paros, and we took a ferry that, for less than 8 euros, would leave us at the port of Naxos about 45 minutes later. Upon arrival we walked 10 minutes from the port to the apartment complex where we had rented at the last moment from Paros: Spyros. It was not bad at all. A little pool with sun loungers, 2 minutes walk from the beach of Saint George and very quiet. In addition, we put the 5 in an apartment and the thing came out for only 11 euros a night. A bargain even in low season.

Naxos is not one of the Aegean party islands, such as Mykonos and Ios, but rather quiet but with very beautiful beaches. And the truth is that we, accustomed to the gray Dublin climate, it is the beach that we valued most. Still we had a good cocktail night, laughs, stories of the past and anecdotes thousand in a little terrace of Captain Morgan: Highly recommended for the nonexistent headache the next day despite catching a good blind. As bars or small pubs, we also have The Nostra Thing -which they recommended but we saw him dead- and several more in the little walk that crosses the area of ​​the port. For disco theme I recommend the Ocean, which was not bad to be off season.

As for restaurants, there are also many intermingled with pubs in the same port area. Quite a few of them are specialized in fish and seafood but I can't tell you about the quality because we ate in the shabby bars of our typical Gyro area, which is like a tremendously good and economical Kebap.

The second morning we were there we rent some bikes -5 euros a day- and we went to see a couple of beaches that recommended the tourist map we had: Agia Anna and Agios Prokopios. The tour was worth it. They are two beaches of white sand and crystal clear water. There were hardly any people and, for nudist lovers, Prokopios is famous for it. Near it I found a place to rent sports equipment and informed me of prices to see if I was renting a kayak. The theme is not cheap and was similar to what we found in Paros: 14 euros per hour in kayak and 23 hours in windsurfing. Of course, the kid was a majete and was more bored than the Snorkels in a fishbowl, so we got a good talk. We ate at a restaurant that had tables almost in the sand on the beach. I remember how, after tasting the Greek salad and a couple of country dishes made with meat and spices accompanied by a beer Mythos, we lie on our chairs, look at each other, sigh and exclaim: This is life, kids!

Another very popular way to get around all the Cyclades It is renting a quad, moped or buggies, but as we had already done in Paros, we prefer bikes. The prices depend on the displacements you choose and range from 15 to 35 euros per day.

As my great Uruguayan friend Diego says: equipment that works does not touch, so the second night - and last of our trip - we went to our Captain Morgan and we squeeze the last laughs under the Greek starry sky.

A propeller plane of Olympic Airlines -I strongly recommend it for internal flights in Greece- it would take us to Athens - after a 45-minute flight - to wait there for our flight to Dublin. Gone are Athens with its Parthenon, Paros with its buggies, its beaches and its two bars and the quiet and beautiful Naxos. We will have to come back!

5.001

Pin
Send
Share
Send